“We’re made of star stuff”

… said astronomer Carl Sagan. And so “Star Stuff” was an appropriate name for the “festival of the cosmos” in Byron Bay last weekend. It was a beauty, with top-name astronomers, and astrophysicists, astrophotographers and science media personalities on the menu. It was set at just the right level for 400 or so amateur astronomers (adults and teenagers), whether they used telescopes or not. Volunteers from the Southern Astronomical Society (based in Logan, Gold Coast and Tweed Heads) helped with organisation, and there were merchandise stalls for books and telescopes from sponsors, who also generously donated “lucky door” prizes. Folks from the North Coast Astronomy Facebook group were there, too. There was even a virtual reality experience of walking on Mars (the queues were too big so I didn’t have a go at this – it would have been amazing).

Byron Lighthouse by Luke Taylor

 

Here’s what happened. Some talks were more detailed than I have described but I am only going by my notes – too much information to remember it all.

Saturday June 24th

8:30am – Event Start Registration & Entry @ Banksia Pavilion

9:30am – Welcome to Country & Introduction [welcome by Arakwal woman, Delta Kay]

10:00am – Dr Duane Hamacher (Monash University) – “Aboriginal Astronomy: Sixty Thousand Years of Science & Culture”.

I knew next to nothing about this. Duane works at the Monash University Indigenous Centre and has done a lot of work on this with Aboriginal people all over Australia.

He talked about the precise observation of stars over many years, sometimes millenia, that has been demonstrated by Aboriginal cultures, and its links to their way of life. (That sounds stuffy, but he was anything but.)

For instance, the emu and its orientation in the sky tells when it’s time to go out looking for edible emu eggs and when to stop because they won’t be available. “To spot the emu, look south to the Southern Cross; the dark cloud between the stars is the head, while the neck, body and legs are formed from dust lanes stretching across the Milky Way.”

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The emu in A is a female, running to catch a male for mating (the females do this in this species of bird.) B shows the male sitting on the eggs, so it’s a good time to go egg-hunting. C shows the male starting to sit up, so the eggs are hatching – not a good time for finding edible eggs. In D the bird is almost below the horizon, so the egg-finding season is finished.

This is the “primary school” level of the tale. There are many other star stories/observations, and like the songlines they embody information in a way that can be relatively easily passed from person to person (see Lynn Kelly’s book, “The Memory Code“, on traditional Aboriginal ways of remembering). You can find more at:

11:15am –  Mark Gee – “Astrophotography – A Personal Journey” – “Photography has been a part of most of my life, but over the past 9 years astrophotography in particular has captured my imagination and interest. I often venture out to the darkest, most remote skies all around the world, enjoying the challenge of combining striking landscapes with the ethereal beauty of the night sky in new, creative ways. In 2013 I shot a short film called ‘Full Moon Silhouettes’, a labour of love, which went viral and inadvertently launched my international astrophotography career. It’s been one hell of a crazy ride, and during this session I will share with you my personal journey.”

Award-winning shot by Mark Gee

Mark Gee enthusing about astrophotography

 

Mark lives in New Zealand and has been on the photography path for 5 years. He told how he got into it and how he started getting offers when one of his videos (the moon rising over the Byron Bay lighthouse) went viral. You can see his beautiful work at http://theartofnight.com

12:00 Noon – LUNCHBREAK [Unsurprisingly, the café at Elements of Byron couldn’t cope with the influx of lunchers in the 1 hour time frame, and the main restaurant was too pricey, so we zoomed down to a café in the Industrial Estate for faster service – local knowledge is useful.]

1:00pm  – Dr David Malin (Australian Astronomical Observatory). “Astro-images from the Ice Age” – “I offer a very brief look at some surprisingly ancient astronomical imaging, and describe how everything changed with the invention of the telescope and then again with the advent of photography, nearly 200 years ago. From the 1990s onwards astro-imaging became increasingly democratised as it embraced the digital era, and today it is ever-more difficult for the amateur to stand out from the crowd. I will offer my views from a perspective of 40 years or so and make some suggestions relevant to today’s astro-imagers.”

David covered quite a lot of ground on the archaeology of astronomical images. His excellent photographic work can be seen at https://www.davidmalin.com/

David Malin quotes Brian Cox

A possible way the Antikythera mechanism worked. It was an ancient Greek analogue computer and orrery used to predict astronomical positions and eclipses for calendrical and astrological purposes (150-100 BC). This diagram has been constructed from the archaeological find.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2:15pm – Dr Fred Watson (Australian Astronomical Observatory) – “Keeping Us All In The Dark (Without Spoiling Our Fun)” – “One of the more notable outcomes of 2015’s International Year of Light was an increased awareness of darkness. With light pollution damaging the night skies of all the world’s cities, there is a growing call for better-designed outdoor lighting to improve the nocturnal environment and avoid wasted energy. This talk shows how today’s technology makes that eminently attainable. It also looks at threats to the night sky of Siding Spring Observatory, where a pristine environment is of paramount importance. Reclaiming the night sky is not just for astronomers and nocturnal animal species, however – but is to the benefit of everyone. Join Fred Watson for this entertaining and informative encounter with the dark side.”

Fred worked for decades as an astronomer at the Siding Spring Observatory but is now involved in campaigns to re-darken the night sky, for health, environmental and scientific reasons. Lights can do their job just as well or better in cities if the light is angled down rather than up, and is often cheaper that way.

His work is at http://www.darksky.org/

3:00pm – AFTERNOON TEA BREAK

4:15pm – Dr Katie Mack – (University of Melbourne) “Dispatches from a Dark Universe” – There’s more to the Universe than we can see — even more than we can ever see. I’ll give a tour of the edges of our knowledge of the cosmos, including where the frontiers are, and what might remain unknowable forever. Come for the Big Bang, stay for the possibility of the ultimate destruction of all of reality! (Topics include dark matter, dark energy, and recent research on Higgs vacuum decay)” [My hero!]

Katie is a theoretical astrophysicist, working on dark matter and dark energy. Some of her many articles are at:

Basic particles as they are understood at present

The composition of the universe as it is presently understood

 

Katie also talked about the “false vacuum”/”true vacuum” theory. This was a new one on me – the idea that our universe may be in a ‘false vacuum’, which may disintegrate instantly at any time. Fun!

Frankly, it’s not something I’m worrying about. If it happens, I won’t know anything about it, instantly.

5:00pm – BREAK

And as the sun set, we wended our way back to Lismore to see the end of the Lantern Parade.

Duck Pond at Elements of Byron

 

6:45pm – Doors Open for VIP Gala Dinner [We missed the dinner and Karl’s speech.]

8:00pm – Dr Karl Kruszelnicki Presents “Great Moments in Space Science – Why do stars have points? Why are asteroids God’s way of enquiring gently about our space program? What colour is the universe? Gravitational Waves and much more.”

9:00pm – Celestron Evolution 6 Giveaway

10am – 6pm : Solar Astronomy (weather permitting) and Vendor Displays in the Belongil Pavilion [I peeked down a telescope and was able to make out a sunspot.]

8pm until Late : Night Sky Tours and Star Gazing / Telescopes from “The Heart of the Bay” Lookout (weather permitting)

Sunday June 25th

9:30am – Jade Rushwood (Byron Bay High School) – “Jupiter and its moons’ orbits – A High School Student’s perspective” – “A look into how a high school student like myself researches the more complicated sides of astrophysical mathematics.”

Jade

 

Jade’s science teacher set a project where the students could choose and complete their own piece of research to investigate a scientific theory. She chose to check Kepler’s equation for the positions of Jupiter’s moons, taking photos of those moons with very basic equipment. At the end of her talk, Dylan gave her a real telescope to make future observations easier.

10:00am Dylan O’Donnell (Byron Bay Observatory) – “Taking Photos of Space That Matter” – “An astrophotographer primer with tips for the beginner and the experienced astrophotographer.” Dylan was the organiser of this event and a fine job he did. His observatory is basically the backyard of his townhouse, and yet in 3 years he has produced some excellent images, which he generously makes available for free.

The photo below went viral on the net and brought him to the attention of NASA (like NASA, he makes his photos available for free).

International Space Station over Australia (public domain 1 July 2015 by Dylan O’Donnell)

If it’s good enough for Chris Hadfield (right, on the International Space Station) …

He’s a self-deprecating young man who has achieved a lot (for a biography, go here). He didn’t technically get excommunicated from the Catholic Church – for the story, go here – but it produced a solid amount of claps from the audience. This James Joyce quote may apply to him (and all of us): “Errors are the portals of discovery”.

11:15am – Mark Gee – “The Art of Astrophotography” – “Join me for a introductory session on how to take wide field astrophotography images. I will cover all of the camera setting and techniques required to get the most out of your DSLR camera, and also demonstrate my processing techniques in Adobe Lightroom.” Mark went into depth about how he takes images and turns them into art via software.

12:00 Noon – LUNCHBREAK

1:00pm – Professor Alan Duffy – “Life, the Universe and Everything (We Can’t See)” – “Our universe is teeming with planets but not, seemingly, aliens. We’re stretched and strained by titanic eruptions that none of us can feel and swept in a galactic wind that none of us notice. I will explore how Australia is leading the charge in understanding the mysteries and close to finally answering the big questions … are we alone, where did we come from and does Einstein always have to be right?”

Alan is a computational astrophysicist at Swinburne University of Technology (Melbourne): “I use supercomputers [creating model universes] to uncover the nature of dark matter (a new type of particle that binds galaxies together) and the key physical laws that govern the formation of galaxies. I focus on two extremes of distance, the very close and the very far from us in the Milky Way. The first is understanding cold gas motions and distributions across the sky in millions of galaxies close to us. The second is in the early universe during the epoch of reionisation, a time when the first galaxies lit up the universe.”

 

Artist impression of some of the exoplanets discovered so far (over 1,000 confirmed)

 

 

After discussing dark matter and energy, black holes, exoplanet detection and detection of life thereon, and gravitational waves, he played us the sound of a gravitational wave – most impressive that we are able to hear this.

And if you want to contribute to serious science about gravitational waves, there’s a citizen science project at https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/news/ligo20161018. It involves sorting through the data of the LIGO project:

As a “Gravity Spy” participant, you will look at real LIGO data in search of ‘glitches’, unwanted hiccups in the signal that can sometimes be confused for or mask out gravitational waves. Glitches make finding the real thing even more difficult than it already is! Nevertheless, they are an unfortunate fact of life for LIGO, so identifying the different kinds of glitches that appear in the interferometer data is crucial for LIGO scientists to be able to distinguish between annoying blips and signals from space!

And, Alan, when is the “Cosmic Vertigo” podcast coming back?

1:45pm – BREAK

2:15pm – Dr Karl Kruszelnicki– “Ask Dr Karl” – “All attendees are invited for a real life interactive session where the audience can ask questions of the man himself!”

Dr Karl

 

Science educator, multiple PhD-holder and all-round smart guy, Dr Karl gave his usual meandering yet fascinating answers to audience questions. I was impressed that he answered young kids’ questions just as seriously as those of adults, even though the adults sometimes (rudely, I felt) tittered at some questions.

3:00pm – BREAK

3:15pm – Jamie Anderson – “Developing Low Cost Access to Space” – “There’s no lack of innovation and entrepreneurship in the space industry, but what is severely lacking is the means of getting these technologies and ideas to space. For a true revolution to occur, similar to what we’ve seen with personal computing and the Internet on Earth, the cost of getting to orbit needs to be drastically reduced. Gilmour Space Technologies is one of a new breed of space ventures taking on the challenge of building rockets, using breakthrough technologies in safe propulsion and 3D printing, among others, to provide truly low cost access to space.”

Jamie is Head of Propulsion at Singapore and Australia’s answer to SpaceX and spoke enthusiastically about Gilmour’s projects.

4:00pm – Michaela Jeffery – “Overview of ESA’s Operations in Australia” – “Discussing how facilities located in Australia have supported some of ESA’s most important missions, and the ongoing relationship between ESA and Australia.”

Michaela is a mechanical engineer at Boeing and spoke about the European Space Agency projects (Rosetta, Mars Express, Gaia). It is a shame Australia is not a partner and seems to be missing out on lots of useful results of projects.

4:30pm – Giveaway & Closing Ceremony [We left after this.]

5:00pm – BREAK FOR DINNER

7:30pm – MOVIE SCREENING – “Hidden Figures” (2016) – “Three brilliant African-American women at NASA — Katherine Johnson (Taraji P. Henson), Dorothy Vaughan (Octavia Spencer) and Mary Jackson (Janelle Monáe) — serve as the brains behind one of the greatest operations in history: the launch of astronaut John Glenn (Glen Powell) into orbit, a stunning achievement that restored the nation’s confidence, turned around the Space Race and galvanized the world.”

10am – 6pm : Solar Astronomy (Weather permitting) & Vendor Displays in the Belongil Pavilion

8pm until Late : Night Sky Tours and Star Gazing / Telescopes from “The Heart of the Bay” Lookout (Weather Permitting)

If anyone is interested in a local event, the North Coast Astronomy group is holding a star-gazing night at the Corndale Hall Corndale event on 19th August – see the North Coast Astronomy FB page.

I have to say it was a bit depressing coming home after a weekend of such fantastic intellectual stimulation, but at least at our home we still have – overhead, shining in all their winter glory in the streetlight-free sky – the stars, the wonderful stars.

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Sharpes Beach fungi

The rain continues on and off. Lismorons (and I mean that in an affectionate way) are a bit over it, but ducks, frogs and fungi are loving it.

There’s a newish walking/cycling/jogging/dog- and/or child-walking path through the heath on the coast at Sharpes Beach. As well as a good spot for surf-watching (always a relaxing activity), at present it has lots of fungi.

The yellow and red species below are stinkhorns, Phallus multicolor and P. rubicunda. The brown slime is stinky and attracts flies, which gobble up the spores and distribute them around the place. Both these species are very common. It’s best to wait for a couple of days after rain to allow time for the fruiting bodies (the main body of the fungus – the mycelium – is underground and what we think of as fungi are actually the fruiting bodies) to appear. The mycelia are saprophytic, meaning they break down organic matter, thereby distributing nutrients  into the soil. These phalluses were in mulch.

Phallus multicolor

Here are some others from the same path. The first two are agarics, Schizophyllum commune. They start off pinky, then bleach to white with age.

Schizophyllum commune; 5c piece on top for scale

Schizophyllum commune, white when bleached with age

 

Next is (probably) Pycnoporus coccineus (the scarlet bracket). The underside shows pores rather than gills (making it a polypore).

Pycnoporus coccineus

Pycnoporus coccineus underside, showing pores

Another polypore …

Underside of the photo below

Amanita xanthocephala

Amanita xanthocephala underside – note the gills, not pores, and there’s no annulus (ring) on the stem. Amanitas generally have an annulus, but this species doesn’t.

When you take photos of the fruiting bodies, ideally you take a shot of the underside as well as the top (to see whether it has gills or pores), and the stem (to see whether it has an annulus or not), and include a 5c piece for scale. Undersides can be seen via a small mirror. If you ask for IDs on a Facebook group like SEQ Fungi, you’ll be in their good books if your photo has all that. Location is vital, too.

After handling fungi, it’s best to wash hands as you do not want to be carrying around more spores than you need to.

IDs are from:

  • “A Guide to Common Fungi of Coastal New South Wales” (Dept of Primary Industries, 2016). This is available as a free download on the last page of ‪http://hunter.lls.nsw.gov.au/resource-hub/publications. The download is called “A Guide to the Common Fungi of the Hunter-Central Rivers Region”, but covers many of our fungi in the Nortern Rivers. I think the 2016 book might be an update.
  • “Australian Subtropical Fungi” (McMullan-Fisher, Leonard and Guard, 2014)
  • Australian Fungi blog.

Any ID mistakes are my own.

Here is a free poster to download for identifying stinkhorns (don’t worry, it’s not scratch and sniff).

If you are on Facebook, there’s a transcript of a good talk on fungi edibility.

And here’s a cute rewriting of Dorothy McKellar’s poem “My Country”: “My Fungi“.

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“In South Australia I was born, heave away, haul away”

… so goes the old sea shanty. My favourite version (which you can hear if you click on the name of the group at right) is that of The Pogues.

Last week I was in one of my old stamping grounds sampling a bit of Cornish culture, or at least the Kerneweck Lowender festival in the Copper Triangle (Kadina, Moonta and Wallaroo in SA). It’s the largest Cornish festival outside of Cornwall.

My mother’s side is Cornish, and great-grandmother Elizabeth Eliza (nee Skewes) came with her husband Charles Edward Courtis from Plymouth to Port Adelaide on the immigrant ship ‘Atalanta’ in 1866. He was listed as a ploughman. They went to the Barossa gold diggings, then to Gawler and Mannum on the Murray River. (One of these days I’ll set up a family history blog with all the info I’ve gleaned.)

Great-granny Courtis, photographed in Gawler, SA, date not recorded

Generations of Courtises are listed in the English records (via Ancestry.com) as living in and around Breage and St Keverne, Cornwall. Neither is a cute Cornish fishing village (like in ‘Doc Martin’ – I’ve been to Port Isaac and it’s just as gorgeous as it looks on TV, at least in the summer) – but they do have their share of history, old buildings and archaeology.

None of the Courtises now live in the Copper Triangle (as far as I’m aware), but relatives from my dad’s side certainly do. I stayed with second-cousin Sharyn, who fed and watered me and showed me around. She was involved in organising some festival events.

Thanks for the hospitality, cousin Sharyn

Many of the townsfolk dress in period costume for the festival. Samantha, below, won best costume in a retail store. She made it herself.

1920’s Cornish fashion

 

There’s maypole dancing …

Maypole dance

 

… and the Furry Dance, still held once a year in Helston, Cornwall. No one seems to know the origin of the dance, but the name is supposed to relate to the Cornish ‘fer’, meaning ‘fair’ or ‘feast’. The modern version is a processional dance along the main street. The original has long died out, and no one seems to know what it was really like, except that it was a celebration of the coming of spring. You can see various versions on Youtube.

Furry Dance

I do love those bagipes, even if they aren’t Cornish

 

All three towns of the Copper Triangle had various events, and I tootled from one to the other. Before and after the festival I visited friends in and around Adelaide. Not much natural historicising (is that even a word?) was done – perhaps the nearest was the sad specimen of a giant squid in the Wallaroo Heritage and Maritime Museum.

I must get back to the real Cornwall one of these days.

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Red-legged pademelon

We see red-necked pademelons (Thylogale thetis), usually alone but sometimes two or three together, in our backyard in early morning and twilight. They are very shy and bolt at the slightest disturbance. The joeys are tiny and very cute.

Up on the mountain, there’s a wallaby I haven’t seen and have now only seen it vicariously. It’s the red-legged pademelon (Thylogale stigmatica). Unfortunately, it was dead when neighbour Jacki found it on her property. Note the darker neck which is one way to distinguish it from the red-necked pademelon. This one had no marks on it, so may have died from natural causes – old age, ticks, internal parasites.

It is a threatened species. The Office of Environment and Heritage website says:

  • Inhabits forest with a dense understorey and ground cover, including rainforest, moist eucalypt forest and vine scrub.
  • Wet gullies with dense, shrubby ground cover provide shelter from predators.
  • In NSW, rarely found outside forested habitat.
  • They disperse from dense shelter areas to feed from late afternoon to early morning, favouring native grasses and herbs on the edge of the forest.
  • Also known to feed on fruits, young seedling leaves and stems, fungi and ferns.

(Photos by Jacki Cooper.)

Wikipedia  says:

The red-legged pademelon behaviour varies in different circumstances. They show least activity in the hours around midday and midnight. Late afternoon, evening and early morning they can be seen grazing on open grassland near the rainforest edges but quickly retreat into the forest if disturbed. They are generally solitary but may group together at night while feeding on grasslands. They feed at equal distances apart and are under the control of one dominant pademelon that controls their feeding area and sets their feeding distance. They communicate by vocalizations and thumping their heels on the ground. They use several vocalizations in social behaviour. In hostile interactions and if a female rejects a male during courtship, a harsh rasping sound is uttered. Soft clucking sounds are made by the courting male; similar sounds are made when a mother is calling her young.

… When the animal is resting, it sits on the base of its tail whilst placing the rest of it between the hind legs. The animal then leans back against a rock or sapling. As it falls asleep, its head leans forward to rest on the tail or on the ground beside it.

…. The main  predators of the Thylogale stigmatica are dingos, tiger quolls, amethystine pythons and domestic dogs.

Finding a corpse at least shows they are still around. Thanks to Jacki for bringing it to my attention.

Posted in Animals on land | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Sometimes the spider wins

I often see a wasp in summer, dragging around a spider larger than itself, whose legs it has have ripped off the spider’s paralysed body. The wasp places the body in its egg chamber, all nice and fresh for the wasp’s larvae to eat when they hatch. Horror movie stuff, but that’s Nature sometimes. She doesn’t have human morality.

But occasionally it’s the other way around. I found this struggle on my umbrella yesterday.

Huntsman eats wasp; the spider is Holconia immanis, ID courtesy of Samii Lawson, Amateur Entomology Australia Facebook group

The huntsman was about 3 cm from tip of cephalothorax to tip of abdomen – a medium size for our subtropical species. They are great at keeping cockroaches in the house down, too.

This spider would have been fast to catch the wasp, and it is a fast hunter, but perhaps it was inspired by the thought of all its paralysed brethren.

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Are we having fun(gi) yet?

What a week! Or at least the last few days. Thankfully the water has drained out of Lismore and the authorities are inspecting to give the all-clear for businesses to start the big clean-up. The mud on the roads and in the buildings is full of toxic c**p (some literally), so care must be taken. Photos on Facebook show water up to a metre from the awnings in shops along the main streets – pubs, the bookshop, cafes, op shops, all of them.

Lismore is a ‘flood town’. It was historically sited at the bottom of a bowl that several rivers drain into before they head to the coast. River was the only way to travel and to trade back then before the great forests were cut down and roads built, so Lismore grew and grew on that same spot. The residents have had to cope with floods from the city’s birth and they know how to prepare and what to do. But this came up so fast and was one of the bigger ones on record (not so big as the one in 1954 or the 1974 one which Andrew remembers as he was 10 and living at Ballina at the time). The levee (built in 2005) has done a great job of protecting the CBD, and it would have been so much worse if it hadn’t been there (although it would have flooded gradually rather than in a rush as it did this time). But even it was overtopped by the massive amount of water flowing down the river. People will pull together and help each other. It’ll all take time.

We had 80 mL in the first 24 hours and then 247.5 mL in the second 24 hours – the biggest one-day reading we’ve had in the 15 years we’ve been here (previous record was 173 in February 2004). Our neighbours at the top of the range behind us had 305 mL to our 247. In the downpour, water started coming under the walls and over the floor of the studio, so we spent the next 90 minutes slooshing water out and removing sodden rugs. At least it wasn’t in the middle of the night. (The studio is badly sited and in really bad downpours water comes out of the neighbouring slope and onto the concrete gutters on the ground, but the drain outlet isn’t big enough to take it away quickly enough.)

Our house lights are out of action because of water getting in the bathroom roof and contacting the light circuit there, and there’s water damage to one outer wall of the bathroom, but we still have power, unlike some people. Good job the builder who is currently renovating our place will be here Tuesday (if he’s not patching up his own place).

Murwillumbah (an hour north by road) is in worse shape – the equipment failed after measuring 6.2 metres river height, bigger than the formerly biggest recorded one in 1954, which was only 6.05. Their sewerage system has stopped working and all the roads in and out of Mur’bah are cut off. Lismore’s top was 11.57 metres.

You can see some photos of events in Lismore here. If you are on Facebook, you can see videos and photos from residents, the Lismore SES and especially Rotorwing Helicopter services.

On the plus side, fungi fanatics are anticipating great finds. The previous weekend we went to the Queensland Herbarium at Mt Coot-Tha Botanic Gardens for a fungi exhibition and associated art display. I managed to meet some folks from the Facebook group, SEQ Fungi, and they are as keen as mustard. I can certainly see the attraction. I’ll post about that next time.

In the meantime, here’s a few shots of a Scleroderma puffball over a few days last week in the backyard before it all went to rain.

 

 

And totally empty after the rain …

We had a few refugees after the rain – no idea where Ms Sqwarky came from. She’s moved on now …

Valanga irregularis, ID courtesy Bruce Turnbull, Amateur Entomology Australia FB page

Posted in Fungi, Weather | Tagged , | 10 Comments

Big Scrub Landcare fungal foray (Part 2)

This is the second part of my fungi photos from the Nightcap National Park foray last weekend. Part 1 is here.

These beauties …

… come from these ‘babies’ …

Underside of the fungus in the previous photo

Phillipsia subpurpurea

Phillipsia subpurpurea underside

 

A yellow mycelium (the main part of fungus through which nutrients are absorbed) growing on a rotting log

Catherine searching out fungi

 

Non-fungi finds

Slime mould

Another slime mould

The giant panda snail (Hedleyella falconeri) is Australia’s largest land snail and (surprise, surprise) eats fungi.

Hedleyella falconeri

Hedleyella falconeri underside

Vine aerial roots

What the Big Scrub might have looked like, before it was cut down

 

Keep an eye out for another fungal foray later in the year, thanks to Big Scrub Landcare. Thanks to Steve and Catherine for a sterling guiding effort.

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