Wattle goat moth

I saw this mating pair of wattle goat moths (Endoxyla lituratus?) in the Tasmanian Bushland Garden near Buckland, north of Hobart, in late December.

Endoxyla_Tas

Wattle goat moth (Endoxyla species) mating pair, Tasmania

These are big moths …

Endoxyla moths mating, Tasmania

If a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush, what are two moths in the bush worth?

They are called “wattle” moths because their caterpillars bore through acacias (wattles), and “goat” because the caterpillars have an unpleasant smell. Black cockatoos rip open the acacia bark to feed on these juicy 10-cm long mouthfuls.

The Tasmanian Bushland Garden is an impressive 20-acre patch, run by volunteers who have planted a huge range of Tassie flora, including endangered species. Each plant/tree/bush is labelled – it’s a quick way to get to know the local wildflowers.

The Garden has other inhabitants – lots of flighty small birds and more sedate garden sculptures …

Thylacine sculpture, Tasmanian Bushland Garden

Thylacine (extinct Tasmanian tiger) sculpture, Tasmanian Bushland Garden

Dinosaur sculpture Tasmanian Bushland Garden

Dinosaur sculpture, Tasmanian Bushland Garden
Wren sculpture, Tasmanian Bushland Garden

Wren sculpture, Tasmanian Bushland Garden

Wegdetail eagle sculpture, Tasmanian Bushland Garden

Wegdetail eagle sculpture, Tasmanian Bushland Garden

Owl sculpture, Tasmanian Bushland Garden

Owl sculpture, Tasmanian Bushland Garden

Black currawong sculpture, Tasmanian Bushland Garden

Black currawong sculpture, Tasmanian Bushland Garden

This little excursion was a delightful short stop-off on the way to Swansea and a credit to the volunteers who maintain it.

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9 Responses to Wattle goat moth

  1. Denis Wilson says:

    Great Moths.
    Liked the sculptures too.
    Denis

  2. Ken says:

    When I saw the picture I thought that ‘goat’ moth was a good name – but then you say that it’s from the smell! When you look at the head of the one pointing down (male?) I reckon his head looks like a goats head – or at least like a sheep’s head.

    The sculptures remind me of the life’s work of a bush sculptor who lost his life’s work in the Victorian fires a few years ago.

  3. Wow, i was startled by that second photo, showing how big those moths are! (I’d noticed the nail in the first photo, so figured I had an idea of how big they are…wrong.) Dang!

  4. kathy says:

    Have not seen that bush garden yet! What a good excuse to go for another trip to Tassie. Do you know if that area has been affected by any fires? I’ll have to do some research. Thanks for a great post with clear descriptions and close up photos.

    • Joy Window says:

      Thanks, Kathy! Yes, any excuse to go back to Tassie. Next time I’ll start in Lonnie (Launceston) and look at the natural history area in the north. Sorry, I don’t know whether this bush garden was affected by the fires – it has not been mentioned in the media, so maybe not. I want to go to the botanic gardens in Hobart, too, and see the Macquarie Island exhibit among other things. I’d love to go on a tour to Antarctica, but I get really seasick.

  5. Pingback: Two weeks in Tassie (part 1) | A-roving I will go

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