Launceston architecture

I love walking among old beautiful buildings. That’s one of the reasons I loved many towns and cities in England, and Charleston and Savannah in the USA, so much. And now there’s a place in Australia I can do the same.

Tasmanian cities and towns are full of stone buildings built in the 1800s – in most towns, they haven’t been replaced by hideous modern stuff. Below are some of the buildings in Launceston. You can take several self-guided walks using a brochure from the information centre. We had only a day and a bit to meander around Launceston, and these are some of the images Angela and I took.

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Interior, Launceston main post office; photo by Angela Coco

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Chalmers Church (not used as a church at present), built in 1859, originally the Free Church of Scotland, then Presbyterian, deconsecrated in 1981

More fine architecture in Launceston …

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Albert Hall convention centre, first used as such in 1891, listed on the Register of the National Estate in 1978; photo by Angela Coco

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Holy Trinity Anglican Parish Church

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Lienard and Moreau fountain in Princes Square, first exhibited in Paris in 1855

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Town Hall plaque – note the chained thylacines (the now extinct, systematically murdered by humans Tasmanian tiger) on the left and right

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Batman Fawkner Inn pub sign; photo by Angela Coco

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City Baptist Church; photo by Angela Coco

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Post Office clock tower opposite Princes Square, built 1889; photo by Angela Coco

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Batman Fawkner Inn, once the Cornwall Hotel, built in 1824

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Diana (the Huntress) on the Branch Office Business Centre building on the corner of Cameron and George streets; statues of Venus and Fortuna are on the same building

Oast house, Boag's Brewery, Launceston

Oast house, Boag’s Brewery

Boag's Brewery, Launceston

Boag’s Brewery

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Now a fine wood furniture shop

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Town Hall

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Macquarie House, a warehouse built in 1829

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Milton Hall

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Masonic Centre, finished 1884 (Italian style, Corinthian façade)

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Private house; photo by Angela Coco

And there are many, many more. Perhaps I am so attracted to this era of architecture because I grew up in an 1880s stone cottage in South Australia. Launceston is delightful.

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3 Responses to Launceston architecture

  1. janebeau says:

    I’m nuts about Victorian buildings – and engineering – too. You’d love San Francisco’s “Painted Ladies”! xx j

  2. Pingback: Two weeks in Tassie (part 3) | A-roving I will go

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