Native plant lists for Bungabee and Bentley areas

When revegetating land, it’s helpful to know what was originally in the area and what seed banks are likely to be in the soil once you get rid of the lantana and other weeds. These are the plants that are mostly likely to survive if you plant them or allow the seedlings that pop up on their own to mature. Doing a condensed version of the TAFE bush regeneration course focusing on botany rather than such things as fence construction or chainsaw use, thanks to a government grant, made me aware of ways to do this.

I managed to get hold of a couple of lists via National Parks. They were done by Alan Roberts and Rob Kooyman. They are a bit out of date, but should give an idea of what’s living in the McKellar Ranges at the Boundary Creek (Bentley) and Bungabee State Forest areas. Just ignore the pencil scratchings – they are my notes. The ‘M’ means I’ve found them on my property.

Bentley flora and fauna 1/3

Boundary Creek, Bentley flora and fauna 1/3

Bentley Flora and Fauna List_2_copy

Boundary Creek, Bentley flora and fauna 2/3

Bentley Flora and Fauna List_3_copy

Boundary Creek, Bentley flora and fauna 3/3

Bungabee State Forest flora and fauna 1/6

Bungabee State Forest flora and fauna 1/6

Bungabee State Forest Flora and Fauna List_2_copy

Bungabee State Forest flora and fauna 2/6

Bungabee State Forest Flora and Fauna List_3_copy

Bungabee State Forest flora and fauna 3/6

Bungabee State Forest Flora and Fauna List_4_copy

Bungabee State Forest flora and fauna 4/6

Bungabee State Forest Flora and Fauna List_5_copy

Bungabee State Forest flora and fauna 5/6

Bungabee State Forest Flora and Fauna List_6_copy

Bungabee State Forest flora and fauna 6/6

And lastly here’s a list of the plants identified in my own rainforest gully in Larnook

(thanks to Nan and Hugh Nicholson).

Alectron sp.

Bangalow palm (Archantophoenix cunninghamiana)

Blue quandong (Eliocarpis grandis)

Bolwarra (Eupomatia laurina)

Brush bloodwood (Baloghia lucida)

Brush stringybark (Rodamnia rubescens)

Churnwood (Cirtonella moorei)

Cordyline sp.

Cunjevoi (Alocasia brisbanensis)

Flooded gum (Eucalyptus grandis)

Foambark (Jagera pseudorhus)

Giant watergum (Syzygium franciscii)

Illawarra flame tree (Brachychiton acerifolius)’

Mist flower (Eupemacia adenophorum)

Murrogun (Cryptocarya microneura)

Myrtle ebony (Diospyrus pentamera)

Native ginger (Alpinia caerulea)

Native rosella (Hibiscus heterophyllus)

Native tamarind (Diploglottis australis)

Pollia (Pollia crispate) (resembles wandering jew but bigger, slightly above ground level)

Red kamala (Mallotus philippensis)

Riberry (Syzygium leuhmanni)

Sandpaper fig (Ficus coronate)

Strangler fig (Ficus watkinsiana)

Whitebean (Ailanthus triphysia)

White beech (Gmelina leichhardtii)

White bollygum (Neolitea dealbata)

Yellow carabeen (Sloanea woollsii, tallest tree in subtropical rainforest, typically has split bark on buttress)

 

Grasses

Basket grass (Oplismenus aemulus)

 

Vines

Bird’s nest fern (Asplenum australacium)

Five-leaf water vine (Cissus hypyglauca)

Lawyer vine (Calamus meulleri)

Maidenhair (either Adiantum diaphanum or A. hispidum)

Pothos (Pothos longipes)

Ripergonum sp.

Snake vine (Stephania japonica)

These lists may all be helpful to anyone pondering their own bush regeneration in this area.

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One Response to Native plant lists for Bungabee and Bentley areas

  1. kath says:

    Good to know what is on your front doorstep. Congratulations on making the effort.

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