Australian Geographic Lord Howe Island citizen science insect expedition (part 2)

Day 3

It rained heavily but briefly in the night, but the day was another glorious fine and sunny one. Bryan Lessard took a group up the Goat House to place malaise traps for catching passing insects over the next few days.

Bryan sweeping for flies at the Goat House

Bryan sweeping for flies at the Goat House. The airstrip is in the background, and the houses and lodges at the settlement appear as white dots among the trees further back. (Photo by Luke Hanson)

Setting up the malaise trap

Setting up the malaise trap (photo by Luke Hanson)

What goes up ...

What goes up … (photo by Luke Hanson)

... surely must come down

… surely must come down (photo by Luke Hanson)

(Photo Luke Hanson)

Lagoon in the background. Mt Eliza is the highest peak in the distance (photo by Luke Hanson)

Brian was thrilled to find the new species of soldier fly he was looking for. He gained a certain amount of notoriety when he named a new fly after singer Beyoncé. He’s also done a TEDX talk on flies, available here.

Bryan's inspiration is aspiration (photo by Luke Hanson)

Bryan’s inspiration is aspiration (photo by Luke Hanson)

I’d been up to the Goat House a couple of times before and, as you can see, on a fine day the view is really fabulous. (By the way, the once-large goat population is almost extinct after a lot of effort. Apparently only three nannies are left and none is pregnant.) But yesterday I was rather dispirited by my inability to keep up with most of the others, so decided to stay behind. Mind you, a couple of them got 9th place in the World Rogaining Championships, so I suppose it’s unfair to compare. I wasn’t the only one not Goat Housing, though, so I went Andreas and Glenn and the others to the Research Station. More than 50 separate species of moth had been caught the night before and they needed ID-ing, pinning and setting.

Sorting moths at the Research Station

Helen sorts moths at the Research Station.

Glenn demonstrates how to pin a moth. Margaret and I had a go but left it to super-fast Glenn

Glenn demonstrates how to pin a moth. Margaret and I had a go, but left the rest to super-fast Glenn. We appreciated the chance to try, though.

After lunch, the whole group went through the banyan trees and kentia palm forest to Little Island at the base of the two big mountains. In the photo below, look at the top of the green section – that’s the route you take along the base of Mt Lidgbird, then round the corner and up, up, up to Mt Gower’s amazing cloud forest. I went up there a few years ago and it’s awesomely awesome. We were at the top waiting for the dinosaurs to come out and start munching the ferns 🙂 and heard rumbling – looking down, we saw that we were above a thunderstorm. We had to walk down the steep path through the clouds, thunder and bucketing rain, barely seeing the ground for the water running across it. All made it down safe and sound, though – quite an adventure!

Little Island

Little Island, with Mt Lidgbird and the route to Mt Gower in the background

Providence petrels breed on the top of Mt Gower

Providence petrels breed uniquely on the top of Mt Gower.

Andreas and Glenn spent the night in the forest, waking regularly to take moths from the light trap and then back to base the next morning with their specimens for pinning and setting.

To be continued …

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4 Responses to Australian Geographic Lord Howe Island citizen science insect expedition (part 2)

  1. Roz says:

    Wonderful account of your activities and Lord Howe is now on my bucket list.
    And I love the idea of being above the thunderstorm.

  2. janebeau says:

    I hadn’t realised how much scary mountaineering was involved! Well done for conquering it all! Xx j

    • Joy Window says:

      It’s pretty safe as long as you watch where you’re going and don’t try to go too fast. There are plenty of ropes on the very steep bits, but nothing vertical. The rock is too crumbly for actual mountaineering. Worth it for the view.

  3. Cate Clark says:

    Wow, fly sweeping and thundercloud diving! Glad u survived the tedious along with the dramatic and the scientific!

    On Wed, Nov 9, 2016 at 11:32 AM, A-roving I will go wrote:

    > Joy Window posted: “Day 3 It rained heavily but briefly in the night, but > the day was another glorious fine and sunny one. Bryan Lessard took a group > up the Goat House to place malaise traps for catching passing insects over > the next few days. &” >

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